Teaching Your Teen to Cope with Stress

According to recent American Psychological Association’s Stress in America Survey, our younger generation is increasingly more stressed. More than 1 in 4 teens and young adults say they do not feel they are doing enough to manage their stress, compared with about 1 in 10 older adults.

The APA’s survey also indicated that teens are more likely to report using passive rather than active coping strategies, which are not always as helpful. Teens rely mainly on taking a nap, listening to music, going online, eating and playing video games to cope with stress and depression. Below are some more active ways of coping which parents can easily discuss and teach to their children.

 Physical Activity

One in five teens and young adults report exercising less than once a week or not at all. Exercise is one of the most effective stress and anxiety relievers. Any of these activities are helpful: yoga, hiking, biking, walking, dancing, running, rock climbing, skateboarding. The best activity is one which involves a social component. Doesn’t need to be a team sport.

Get Enough Sleep

The recommended amount of sleep for teens is 8-10 hours, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics’ 2016 recommendations. However, Stress in America Survey found that most teens sleep on average only 7.4 hours. Lack of sleep is related to increased levels of stress, anxiety, and depression and decreased academic performance. Teens who don’t get enough sleep are 4 times as likely to develop depression as those who are well-rested. Optimum sleep hours for young people start at 11 pm and end at 8 am according to research.

 Resist Pressure

Teens are pressured more than ever to make so many choices, to know exactly who they are, to perform perfectly all the time, to achieve greater and greater. There is competition, social judgement, pressure from parents and teachers and society. Teach them they don’t have to be perfect, don’t have to get it right at any age, can always change their minds and their personality when they are older. What they do now will not determine their entire lives.

Reduce Time Spent On Social Media

Psychologist and pediatricians believe that increasing dependence on social media by teenagers is leading to increased rates of depression and anxiety, especially for girls, although boys are not immune. Girls are more likely to use social media and depend on it for communication, exposing them at greater rates to cyberbullying and preventing other healthier ways of social support. Girls are prone to comparing themselves to peers and defining their identify via others’ opinions, making them very vulnerable to depression after repeated exposures to social media.

There are estimates that the average teen spends 7.5 hours on social media on a typical day. That means your teen feels under pressure to be “clever, smart, popular” for the entire day, first at school and then on social media. It also means your teen is being judged and criticized all day long, exposing your teen to constant social pressure. A rumor spread on social media reaches thousands of people in a second.

It’s stressful, draining and damaging.

A recent Swedish study found that teens who spend a lot of time on the internet are as likely to become depressed and suicidal as teens who use drugs and skip school.

Don’t allow your teen on social media until age 14-15. Teach your teen to limit the number of friends they have on social media and limit how many social media apps they use. Follow your teen on social media to monitor their activity. Teach them to block all cyberbullies and only stay in groups that are fun, entertaining, social. Teach your teen no to use social media for mental health support or share their inner most secrets on social media.

Cut Down On Sugar And Eat More Foods That Give Energy

Your teen should always eat breakfast. Teach them to eat foods that are easy to digest but will give them energy: fruit, nuts, yogurt. Teach them to eat more protein and vegetables and less refined carbs and fast foods.

Meditate or Practice Mindfullness

Mindfullness refers to paying attention to life in the present. Being fully aware of your surroundings and what you are doing. Being in the moment and enjoying it fully, rather than constantly being distracted by electronics, social media, etc. When we don’t have the ability to be in the moment, anxiety can sneak up on us. People who are always distracted and always worry about the future, begin to struggle with chronic stress and anxiety.

Teach your teen to put away their phone at the dinner table or turn off your TV next time that your family is eating dinner. Just focus on eating your food and enjoying its flavors. Or next time your teen is watching a Netflix show, teach them to not Tweet about it or talk to friends about it at the same time. Just discuss fully tuning in to the show. It’s that simple.

Talk To Someone About Your Stress

Everyone is feeling more stressed out these day. It’s absolutely OK to talk about it. Teach your teen to talk to you and other family members about it, to talk to their friends, and, finally, ask to talk to a psychologist about it. There are also many books you can browse on the topic.

Rates of Teen Girls’ Suicides Have Doubled

You may have noticed headlines in the last 24 hours discussing that, according to the CDC, the rates of suicide for teen girls ages 15-19 have recently doubled.

While this is very troubling, what concerns me even more is that the rates of suicide for girls ages 10-14 have tripled.

Here are some other statistics: Suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death for ages 10-24, and it results in about 4600 deaths every year in that age group.

However, it is misleading to worry just about girls. Boys are much more likely to die from suicide. In the age group of 10-24, CDC reports that 81% of the deaths were males and only 19% were females. What we know is that, while girls are more likely to contemplate suicide, boys are more likely to actually complete it.

So, don’t listen to the media raising panic about girls ages 15-19. Watch for signs of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in girls AND boys. Remember, that boys and younger girls are actually at more risk.

Risk factors for suicidal thoughts/behaviors:

  • Alcohol or drug use
  • Stressful life events
  • Access to lethal weapons
  • Exposure to the suicidal behavior of others (on YouTube, social media, television shows, such as 13 Reasons Why) or hearing about it from friends.
  • History of depression, anxiety, ADHD, or other mental illness
  • Family history of suicide
  • History of previous suicide attempts

If your child is at risk or is struggling with mental health difficulties, please contact a mental health professional, a pediatrician, or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-TALK.

New Study on Teens’ Electronics Use

Studies show that U.S. teens spend an average of 8.5 hrs per day on their electronics. Unfortunately, developing adolescent brain is particularly vulnerable to sleep deprivation, depression, anxiety, and risk-taking behavior. An area of the brain, called prefrontal cortex, which specializes in judgment, impulse control, and planning is still developing in adolescence.

A new study just published in Child Development demonstrates a correlation between late night cell phone use, disturbed sleep, increased risk of depression, risk-taking behavior, and low self-esteem. The study involved 1,1000 teens (ages 13 to16) and took place over 4 years.

This is not quite new information. Psychologists and physicians have known for a while that bright light from electronic screens can interfere with sleep cycles by tricking the brain into thinking that it is still daytime and decreasing production of melatonin. Additionally, the teens continue to think about texts and content of reading/video/audio material on devices and simply can’t relax enough to go to sleep.

Sleep deprivation has previously been demonstrated in research to be linked to depression, risk-taking behavior, poor self-esteem, poor attention, and obesity.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has encouraged that teens get 8-10 hours of sleep every day.

Psychologists recommend the following for parents of teens:

  • Take TV, computer, tablets out of teen room permanently
  • Take cell phone out of the room at a time you both agree on (should be a time that would allow your teen to get at least 8 hrs of sleep)
  • If your teen insists on listening to music before going to sleep, buy a device that only plays music but doesn’t have a bright screen.
  • Charge all devices in the parents’ room
  • Use a regular alarm clock instead of a phone alarm clock

 

Teaching Your Teen to Cope with Stress

According to recent American Psychological Association’s Stress in America Survey, our younger generation is increasingly more stressed. More than 1 in 4 teens and young adults say they do not feel they are doing enough to manage their stress, compared with about 1 in 10 older adults.

The APA’s survey also indicated that teens are more likely to report using passive rather than active coping strategies, which are not always as helpful. Teens rely mainly on taking a nap, listening to music, going online, eating and playing video games to cope with stress and depression. Below are some more active ways of coping which parents can easily discuss and teach to their children.

 Physical Activity

One in five teens and young adults report exercising less than once a week or not at all. Exercise is one of the most effective stress and anxiety relievers. Any of these activities are helpful: yoga, hiking, biking, walking, dancing, running, rock climbing, skateboarding. The best activity is one which involves a social component. Doesn’t need to be a team sport.

Get Enough Sleep

Recommended amount of sleep for teens is 8-10 hours, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics’ 2016 recommendations. However, Stress in America Survey found that most teens sleep on average only 7.4 hours. Lack of sleep is related to increased levels of stress, anxiety, and depression and decreased academic performance. Teens who don’t get enough sleep are 4 times as likely to develop depression as those who are well-rested. Optimum sleep hours for young people start at 11 pm and end at 8 am according to research.

 Resist Pressure

Teens are pressured more than ever to make so many choices, to know exactly who they are, to perform perfectly all the time, to achieve greater and greater. There is competition, social judgement, pressure from parents and teachers and society. Teach them they don’t have to be perfect, don’t have to get it right at any age, can always change their minds and their personality when they are older. What they do now will not determine their entire lives.

Reduce Time Spent On Social Media

Psychologist and pediatricians believe that increasing dependence on social media by teenagers is leading to increased rates of depression and anxiety, especially for girls, although boys are not immune. Girls are more likely to use social media and depend on it for communication, exposing them at greater rates to cyberbullying and preventing other healthier ways of social support. Girls are prone to comparing themselves to peers and defining their identify via others’ opinions, making them very vulnerable to depression after repeated exposures to social media.

There are estimates that the average teen spends 7.5 hours on social media on a typical day. That means your teen feels under pressure to be “clever, smart, popular” for the entire day, first at school and then on social media. It also means your teen is being judged and criticized all day long, exposing your teen to constant social pressure. A rumor spread on social media reaches thousands of people in a second.

It’s stressful, draining and damaging.

A recent Swedish study found that teens who spend a lot of time on the internet are as likely to become depressed and suicidal as teens who use drugs and skip school.

Don’t allow your teen on social media until age 14-15. Teach your teen to limit the number of friends they have on social media and limit how many social media apps they use. Follow your teen on social media to monitor their activity. Teach them to block all cyberbullies and only stay in groups that are fun, entertaining, social. Teach your teen no to use social media for mental health support or share their inner most secrets on social media.

Cut Down On Sugar And Eat More Foods That Give Energy

Your teen should always eat breakfast. Teach them to eat foods that are easy to digest but will give them energy: fruit, nuts, yogurt. Teach them to eat more protein and vegetables and less refined carbs and fast foods.

Meditate or Practice Mindfullness

Mindfullness refers to paying attention to life in the present. Being fully aware of your surroundings and what you are doing. Being in the moment and enjoying it fully, rather than constantly being distracted by electronics, social media, etc. When we don’t have the ability to be in the moment, anxiety can sneak up on us. People who are always distracted and always worry about the future, begin to struggle with chronic stress and anxiety.

Teach your teen to put away their phone at the dinner table or turn off your TV next time that your family is eating dinner. Just focus on eating your food and enjoying its flavors. Or next time your teen is watching a Netflix show, teach them to not Tweet about it or talk to friends about it at the same time. Just discuss fully tuning in to the show. It’s that simple.

Talk To Someone About Your Stress

Everyone is feeling more stressed out these day. It’s absolutely OK to talk about it. Teach your teen to talk to you and other family members about it, to talk to their friends, and, finally, ask to talk to a psychologist about it. There are also many books you can browse on the topic.